A Quick Twitter Roundup from #hdpalooza

I’m excited to be attending Health Datapalooza (#hdpalooza if you prefer) to cover the event for Healthcare IT Today. It’s an exciting time in healthcare. It’s taken 10 years to get to where we are today, but 10 years of Health Datapalooza has gotten us access to a lot more data than we had 10 years ago. However, as this Twitter roundup shows, we still have plenty of work to do to get value out of all that data. Plus, there is still plenty of healthcare data we still need.

Given the social media friendly crowd at Health Datapalooza, I thought the best way to summarize the first day of the conference is in a roundup of tweets from the conference with some short commentary. I hope you enjoy.


Health Datapalooza is lucky to have 2 incredible people as co-chairs. Kelsey and Rasu are both brilliant people who understand the true heart of healthcare.


If you know Rasu, you’ll understand why Nick Adkins and his #PinkSocks were a part of Health Datapalooza. For some, his message might feel out of place, but it was definitely a unique way to start off a conference about data. When we’re talking about data it’s often easy to forget that each of those data elements represents a person. Nick helped us remember to look for the good even amidst the chaos of healthcare.


Speaking of people with heart, you’ll find no one more passionate about health data than Mandi Bishop. Not to mention her passionate partner in crime, the Mighty Casey Quinlan. Mandi’s advice is great. The best way to unlock the silos of data is through connections with the people who have the data.


Given this is a data conference, this friendly reminder that correlation is not causation seems essential to start the conference.


This seems like an underlying theme of health data access. Patients want data and many doctors are afraid what access to that data means.


Interesting take by Anil Sethi. I agree with him that data is very personal and needs to be provided on the individual level. However, big data is alive and well in healthcare. Plus, we need the big data to better serve the individual patient.


This was some great advice for everyone. It comes on the heals of the FTC Complaint that was filed about Facebook using patient data inappropriately. You can learn more at MissingConsent.org.


Cute little twist on words. Are we there yet?


I think this is the overarching feeling from most at the conference. However, when you look outside those at the conference, this feeling is still very strong and part of the culture that must be changed.


Such a challenging balance.


It’s amazing that every consumer wants this. Will it ever happen or will the cloak of “it’s complicated” remain?


Always great to have patients at a conference to reminds us of this important perspective.


If we started with correlation is not causation, this is a good way to end the first day Twitter roundup from a health data conference. We need the data available at the right place, at the right time, processed into the right insights, so we can have fewer guesses in healthcare.

An amazing first day at Health Datapalooza. A lot of excitement from those attending and passion for unleashing the power of data in healthcare.

Let us know in the comments what you think of the above tweets and any other insights and perspectives you have from Health Datapalooza.

About the author

Sunny Tara

Sunny Tara

Sunny is a serial entrepreneur on a mission to improve quality of care through data science. Sunny’s last venture CareCognitcs, a digital health company that applies consumer loyalty and data science to transform patient behavior. Sunny has an impressive track record of Strategy, Business Development, Innovation and Execution in the Healthcare, Casino Entertainment, Retail and Gaming verticals. Sunny is the Co-Chair for the Las Vegas Chapter of Akshaya Patra foundation (www.foodforeducation.org) since 2010. Sunny brings great practical insights into the use of technology and data in healthcare.

   

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