Patient Satisfaction Drops After Ambulatory EHR Is Rolled Out

In theory, EHR implementations are supposed to not only make providers’ jobs easier but ultimately, improve patient satisfaction too. The idea is that EHRs will eventually add something beneficial to physician routines and ultimately improving care processes. Of course, there’s a lot of question as to whether EHRs can now or will ever do so, but researchers continue to look at different use cases.

For example, new research published in JAMIA has concluded that while they weren’t too thrilled by the ambulatory EHR they were using, a group of OB/GYN practices showed some enthusiasm once the outpatient EHR was attached to the one collecting data on their related inpatient perinatal unit.

The purpose of the study was to look at how the installation of the ambulatory EHR within the OB/GYN practices and subsequent connection to an inpatient perinatal EHR affected providers’ attitudes toward sharing of clinical information. It also looked at the impact all of this had on patient satisfaction.

To conduct the study, researchers collected data on both provider and patient satisfaction. They assessed provider satisfaction by conducting four surveys staged across the phased implementation of the EHR. To measure patient satisfaction, meanwhile, they drew on data from Press Ganey surveys managed by the healthcare network using the usual process.

Their ultimate goal was to determine how provider and patient perceptions changed as the EHR system enabled greater information flow between the OB/GYN practices in the hospital.

What the study found was that the outpatient OB/GYN providers were less satisfied with how the EHR affected their work processes than other clinical and non-clinical staff. On the other hand, they grew more satisfied with their access to information once the inpatient perinatal triage unit offered useful functions. Specifically, they were happier with their access to information from the inpatient system once its capabilities included the ability to send automatic data flows from triage back to the OB/GYN offices.

On the other hand, overall patient reactions to the project appeared to be negative. Patient satisfaction fell after the installation of the ambulatory EHR, and researchers could find no evidence that patient satisfaction rebounded after the information sharing process began between inpatient and outpatient settings.

In summary, the study concluded, if providers are dissatisfied with their EHR system, and those difficulties undercut patient care, the process could negatively impact patient satisfaction. The authors recommended that healthcare organizations take extra care to maintain good communication with patients during this process.

About the author

Anne Zieger

Anne Zieger

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

   

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