Ensuring Patient Comprehension

Erin Gilmer recently posted a very interesting “Literacy Comprehension” form from an Endoscopy Center. Check out the form below:

You have to applaud this effort by a practice to make sure that the patients understand the information being presented to them as part of the procedure. The cynic might argue that the clinic is just trying to cover their backside. However, Erin asks the more important question, “Is this an effective way to prove comprehension?”

I do like how this can open the patient up to the option to have a discussion about something they don’t understand. It sends a good message to the patients in that regard which could make the patient feel more appreciated and help the patient feel comfortable asking a question about something they would have just previously kept to themselves.

However, for those that aren’t literate, I don’t think this form will do much. I expect that many patients that aren’t literate likely get into a zone where they just sign whatever the medical practice gives them regardless of what it is and regardless of whether they can read it or not.

I think the idea is a good one but could be executed better. Could this be done verbally and have a bigger impact? What other ideas have you seen implemented? Do you like this approach or are their better ways to accomplish it?

About the author

John Lynn

John Lynn

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com, a network of leading Healthcare IT resources. The flagship blog, Healthcare IT Today, contains over 13,000 articles with over half of the articles written by John. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 20 million times.

John manages Healthcare IT Central, the leading career Health IT job board. He also organizes the first of its kind conference and community focused on healthcare marketing, Healthcare and IT Marketing Conference, and a healthcare IT conference, EXPO.health, focused on practical healthcare IT innovation. John is an advisor to multiple healthcare IT companies. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can be found on Twitter: @techguy.

   

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