2 Core Healthcare IT Principles

One of my favorite bloggers I found when I first starting blogging about Healthcare IT was a hospital CIO named Will Weider who blogged on a site he called Candid CIO. At the time he was CIO of Ministry Health Care and he always offered exceptional insights from his perspective as a hospital CIO. A little over a month ago, Will decided to move on as CIO after 22 years. That was great news for me since it meant he’d probably have more time to blog. The good news is that he has been posting more.

In a recent post, Will offered two guiding principles that I thought were very applicable to any company working to take part in the hospital health IT space:

1. Embed everything in the EHR
2. Don’t hijack the physician workflow

Go and read Will’s post to get his insights, but I agree with both of these principles.

I would add one clarification to his first point. I think there is a space for an outside provider to work outside of the EHR. Think of someone like a care manager. EHR software doesn’t do care management well and so I think there’s a space for a third party care management platform. However, if you want the doctor to access it, then it has to be embedded in the EHR. It’s amazing how much of a barrier a second system is for a doctor.

Ironically, we’ve seen the opposite is also true for people like radiologists. If it’s not in their PACS interface, then it takes a nearly herculean effort for them to leave their PACS system to look something up in the EHR. That’s why I was excited to see some PACS interfaces at RSNA last year which had the EHR data integrated into the radiologists’ interface. The same is true for doctors working in an EHR.

Will’s second point is a really strong one. In his description of this principle, he even suggests that alerts should all but be done away within an EHR except for “the most critical safety situations. He’s right that alert blindness is real and I haven’t seen anyone nail the alerts so well that doctors aren’t happy to see the alerts. That’s the bar we should place on alerts that hijack the physician workflow. Will the doctor be happy you hijacked their workflow and gave them the alert? If the answer is no, then you probably shouldn’t send it.

Welcome back to the blogosphere Will! I look forward to many more posts from you in the future.

About the author

John Lynn

John Lynn

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com, a network of leading Healthcare IT resources. The flagship blog, Healthcare IT Today, contains over 13,000 articles with over half of the articles written by John. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 20 million times.

John manages Healthcare IT Central, the leading career Health IT job board. He also organizes the first of its kind conference and community focused on healthcare marketing, Healthcare and IT Marketing Conference, and a healthcare IT conference, EXPO.health, focused on practical healthcare IT innovation. John is an advisor to multiple healthcare IT companies. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can be found on Twitter: @techguy.

1 Comment

  • I will be asking that I no longer receive this blog (if that is humanly possible) for the reason that you continue to be focused solely on “physicians” here. Believe me, there is a WHOLE ARMY OF PEOPLE in other professions who use an EHR and who basically keep the work of a medical facility or institution going long after the docs have departed and who have been far more adept at adopting EHRs than the MDs. You continue to think that docs are the ONLY end users who matter (guess you’re just following the money, huh?)…Get real. Over the past years much of the work of physicians has increasingly been delegated to other professionals, whom you NEVER even mention here (doubt you’ve ever heard of them either.) Goodbye and good luck in transitioning to a more up-to-date reality.

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