Medical Robot Infographic

Who doesn’t love medical robots? Combine that with an inforgraphic and you have must see content. At least that’s what I thought about when I saw the following medical robot infographic. We’ve come a long way with robots in healthcare, but the best part is that I think we’re just beginning. Enjoy the medical robot infographic below.
Medical Robot Infographic
Thanks to healthcare-administration-degree.net for creating the infographic.

About the author

John Lynn

John Lynn

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com, a network of leading Healthcare IT resources. The flagship blog, Healthcare IT Today, contains over 13,000 articles with over half of the articles written by John. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 20 million times.

John manages Healthcare IT Central, the leading career Health IT job board. He also organizes the first of its kind conference and community focused on healthcare marketing, Healthcare and IT Marketing Conference, and a healthcare IT conference, EXPO.health, focused on practical healthcare IT innovation. John is an advisor to multiple healthcare IT companies. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can be found on Twitter: @techguy.

1 Comment

  • Just because something can be done, we must scrutinize whether or not it should be done. The da Vinci system is a case in point.

    –A 2010 study found that 56.8 percent of surgeons surveyed anonymously said they had experienced irrecoverable operative malfunctions while using the da Vinci system

    –Women were more likely to be harmed during the robotic procedures

    –cost $1.5 million to $2.5 million

    –“This whole issue is symbolic of a larger problem in American health care, which is the lack of proper evaluation of what we do,” Dr. Martin A. Makary, an associate professor of surgery at Johns Hopkins and the senior author of the paper.

    –researchers at Johns Hopkins were able to find examples of botched operations that were not reported to the agency. They concluded that adverse events associated with the da Vinci were “vastly underreported.”

    –questions about the quality of training provided

    well.blogs.nytimes.com – September 12, 2:32 PM

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