Bring Your Own EHR (BYOEHR)

Nerd Doc recently offered a new term I’d never heard called Bring Your Own EHR (BYOEHR). Here’s the explanation:

As a tech nerd doc, the best advice I can give to CIOs/CMIOs is to find a framework for ambulatory practices that embraces a BYOEHR (Bring your own EHR) in the same vein of BYOD (Bring your own device). What I mean by that is allow providor choice in purchasing and implementing their own EHR while insuring that a framework is set up for cross communication to interlink records.

This is to fend off the trend to a one size (Epic) fits all approach in which no one is happy. C-level management needs to realize that if users (providers) are not happy, the promises of savings via efficiency simply will not happen.

I think we’re starting to hear more and more examples like this. We saw evidence of this in my previous post called “CIO Reveals Secrets to HIE.” That hospital organization had created an HIE that connected with 36 different EMRs. Think about the effort that was required there. However, that CIO realized that there was a benefit to creating all of those connections. The results have paid off with a highly used HIE.

I’m sure we’ll still see hospitals acquiring practices and forcing an enterprise EHR down their throats for a while. However, don’t be surprised if the cycle goes back to doctors providing independent healthcare on whatever EHR they see fits them best. Those hospitals that have embraced a BYOEHR approach will be well positioned when this cycle occurs.

About the author

John Lynn

John Lynn

John Lynn is the Founder of the HealthcareScene.com, a network of leading Healthcare IT resources. The flagship blog, Healthcare IT Today, contains over 13,000 articles with over half of the articles written by John. These EMR and Healthcare IT related articles have been viewed over 20 million times.

John manages Healthcare IT Central, the leading career Health IT job board. He also organizes the first of its kind conference and community focused on healthcare marketing, Healthcare and IT Marketing Conference, and a healthcare IT conference, EXPO.health, focused on practical healthcare IT innovation. John is an advisor to multiple healthcare IT companies. John is highly involved in social media, and in addition to his blogs can be found on Twitter: @techguy.

2 Comments

  • BYOEHR? I do, its on You Tube!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzU5hNzhOTY (Example)
    After a brief explanation to a clinician of the colours he/she has my full medical history even though we might not speak the same language, I am in a foreign country it resolves language barriers.
    As it is set to “Private” view I can keep it reasonably safe.
    If I do have my iPhone on me (not lost or stolen traveling) an example of what I have on my phone https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_l3FxRmtnM
    No I am not a company selling my wares, just making my life easier with my Personal Health Record. It separate out from being tired to a Hospital or Physician system which I need to log in authenticate and only “Invited” to see certain aspects of my record.
    This way I have control over my data and I can “Invite” the Health professionals to view section I want them to see.

  • Why should what EHR you use matter?

    Isn’t the whole point for better records dissemination with all EHR vendors using a standardized data set for inter-operability?

    Oh, wait, maybe that was just the idea we were all sold on.

    The reality is, the major vendors have hijacked what made sense to ensure they can stay relevant.

    Very few hospitals care about a communication framework because they can generally force docs to comply with their demands.

    I see it time and time again where a hospital forces docs to either use the “preferred” EHR or pay to have connectivity created.

    Sure it is interesting to see someone veering from the “norm”…but don’t get too excited, I believe the only thing that will bring true HIE conformity is the oligopoly that we will be left with after the industry consolidation occurs.

    Cynical? Maybe.
    Realistic? Yes.

Click here to post a comment
   

Categories