FTC: This Merger Looks So Good, It Has To Be Illegal

If you’re as cynical as I am, it’s not hard to take a certain amusement in the goings-on in Toledo over the merger between an aggressive for-profit hospital chain and a suburban not-for-profit.

Over the past few months, the Federal Trade Commission seems to have developed a passionate interest in the merger between a formerly Lutheran-owned non-profit, St. Luke’s Hospital of Maumee, OH and ProMedica Health System of Toledo. ProMedica, which owns 11 hospitals in Ohio and Michigan — including four in the Toledo metro — is a swaggering giant with $1.7 billion in annual revenue.

What a sweet deal it was for ProMedica. According to Moody’s, the facility had very little debt ($8.3 million) and 412 percent cash-to-debt coverage as of November 30, 2009 (recently enough to matter).

Sure, as of early 2010 St. Luke’s had an operating cash flow deficiency of -2.0 percent and -9.8 percent operating margin, and at least according to Moody’s, had cut some cut-rate contracts with payors accounting for 22 percent of its operating revenues.

On the other hand, its miserably weak competitive market position which, as Moody’s noted in its downgrade report, included clashes with ProMedica, went away with the stroke of a pen when the two consummated their agreement. ProMedica sweeps in with its Aa3-rated borrowing capacity, invests a relatively slim $35 million and picks up the 10 percent market share SLH held at the time. I don’t know what 10 percent of the market is worth, but that has to be a fire sale.

Dig this if you can, cats and kittens:  According to the FTC,  the deal increases ProMedica’s market share in Toledo to 58 percent of inpatient services and (get this) 80 percent of high-margin inpatient OB services. Wow… Small wonder the FTC smells a rat.

Of course, in the sort of excess of confidence you always see in these deals, ProMedica’s executives are pretending the deal was good for the public and stuff.  I don’t know about you, but I find the following comment (made by ProMedica CEO Randy Oostra to the New York Times) to be preposterous:

“We could coordinate care,” Mr. Oostra said. “We could improve quality at St. Luke’s by adopting electronic health records and using clinical protocols to standardize the delivery of care. But the F.T.C. has stopped us in our tracks.” 

OK, let me get this straight, Mr. Oostra. You could only connect with St. Luke’s by buying it and forcing your EHR down its throat (after all, we know you’re not going to put St. Luke’s on Cerner if you use Epic)? You’re buying a hospital with tremendous upside largely because you think you can standardize care — because that will, of course, increase effectiveness and lower prices?  Oh, and as far as sharing data and coordinating care: have you ever heard of a health information network? Or an Accountable Care Organization?

Really, sir, if you want to impress the FTC with the public benefits of your transaction, you’re going to have to try a little harder. If you’re already phoning it in, to the Times no less, you’re not just arrogant, you’re stupid.

About the author

Anne Zieger

Anne Zieger

Anne Zieger is a healthcare journalist who has written about the industry for 30 years. Her work has appeared in all of the leading healthcare industry publications, and she's served as editor in chief of several healthcare B2B sites.

   

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